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US export terminals to deploy mid-scale liquefaction plants

Mon 11 Mar 2019 by John Snyder

US export terminals to deploy mid-scale liquefaction plants
LNG will be stored in two 200,000 m3 full containment storage tanks, optimising output during colder periods

New US LNG export facilities are building-out their projects with a modular approach, employing mid-scale liquefaction plants

Authorised to site and begin its construction this past February by the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the 10 mta nameplate Calcasieu Pass facility in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, will employ a process solution from GE Oil & Gas, LLC, part of Baker Hughes, a GE company (BHGE) that uses mid-scale, modular, factory-fabricated liquefaction trains.

Developer Venture Global has executed an integrated turnkey engineering, procurement and construction contract with US-based Kiewit to design, engineer, construct, commission, test and guarantee the Calcasieu Pass facility.

The project is based on mid-scale liquefaction technology that will consist of two electrically driven 0.626 mta trains in each block, with nine blocks for the entire facility.

The gas will flow through acid gas removal and dehydration systems before it enters the liquefiers.

The LNG will be stored in two 200,000 m3 full containment storage tanks. This ample storage capacity allows Venture Global to optimise the plant output during colder periods.

The facility will also have two docks to accommodate LNG carriers up to 185,000 m3 capacity.

The project is based on mid-scale liquefaction technology that will consist of two electrically driven 0.626 mta trains in each block, with nine blocks for the entire facility”

Back in December 2018, BHGE was selected to supply Masoneilan control valves and Consolidated safety relief valves for the Venture Global LNG liquefaction facility. Unlike more traditional large-size liquefaction trains, the Venture Global project will use 18 smaller liquefaction modules for a combined capacity of 10 mta of LNG production. Masoneilan and Consolidated valves will be used in both conventional and cryogenic applications.

BHGE global project pursuit leader Stephen James said: “This is truly a full-stream LNG project where BHGE leverages our equipment across the entire scope of the plant. For years, our teams from around the world have worked closely with the design of the LNG modules and systems to optimise our products around their specifications. We are excited to have this major project in our backyard where we can oversee the start-up and help the customer through the lifecycle of their operation.”

Under the terms of the contract, BHGE will supply nearly 1,000 total control and safety relief valves. This is the first phase of construction of three total plants that will be built by Venture Global, in which BHGE will partner in the full-stream supply of equipment.

Houston-based Eagle LNG owns the small-scale Maxville LNG liquefaction terminal near Jacksonville, Florida, which produces about 757,000 litres per day of LNG. The facility, with a storage capacity of 3.8M litres, provides LNG to Eagle LNG’s Talleyrand LNG bunkering station at the Port of Jacksonville via tanker truck. The LNG is used to fuel Crowley Maritime’s two LNG-fuelled container/roro vessels El Coqui and Taino, which sail from Jacksonville to San Juan, Puerto Rico in Jones Act service. The Maxville Facility produces more than enough LNG to meet the bunkering needs of Crowley’s two ships, allowing excess capacity to be sold to customers in the US Southeast and Caribbean.

Eagle LNG is developing a larger, on-water liquefaction plant and terminal in Jacksonville, known as the Jacksonville Export Facility, on a 0.78 km2 site. Awaiting final approval by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the new facility is capable of liquefying 6.24M litres of LNG per day, with 45.4M litres of LNG storage capacity for natural gas exports and additional marine bunkering demand to the Caribbean and Atlantic Basin.

The proposed LNG facility will serve both domestic and international markets, receiving natural gas via pipeline and liquefying and storing it for export to countries currently using heavy fuel oil or diesel for power generation, as well as for use in domestic marine fuelling. The company is seeing increased demand for LNG to serve small-scale export markets, while domestic demand for LNG, to displace diesel and other petroleum fuels, continues to develop.

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